10 Ways to Flavor Food That are Better Than Salt by Karen Ansel, MS, RDN

If your doctor has advised you to ease off the salt shaker, you might be wondering why. The answer is sodium, a mineral found mainly in salt. “Too much sodium in a person’s diet can increase their blood pressure, raising their risk for heart disease, stroke, and kidney disease,” says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, author of Diabetes Cookbook & Meal Plan for the Newly Diagnosed.

10 Ways to Flavor Food That are Better Than Salt

Sodium isn’t all bad. We need small amounts of it for healthy nerves and muscles, and for proper hydration. Trouble is, most people consume too much of it. Americans down more than 3,400 milligrams a day, on average. That’s nearly 50 percent more than the 2,300-milligram limit—the amount found in a teaspoon of salt—that diabetes experts recommend. And if you already have high blood pressure or heart issues, many health care providers suggest consuming even less.

Although salt sensitivity varies from person to person, almost everyone can benefit from cutting back. That starts in your kitchen. Three-quarters of our sodium comes from processed foods (especially bread, cold cuts, soup, frozen meals, and cheese) and restaurant meals, so home cooking can help you cut sodium.

Check out the full feature article from Diabetes Forecast for their top tips for flavoring your meals without pouring on the salt. 

Read the full article on Diabetes Forecast.



 

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